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IOT: What does the Customer Want?

IoT and the Customer
By Juliet Shavit, President and CEO of SmartMark Communications, LLC

I recently sat in a room full of telecom network engineers to discuss the topic of IoT and the customer. I followed several presentations on U/X and BSS, but when it came to my presentation, I felt a sudden stillness in the air. Radio silence. It was terrifying.

A week later I delivered the same address to a number of telecom CEOs at a business conference, and the response couldn’t have been more different. Thankful and full of relief, I began to understand what the critical difference was between the two audiences. The first audience really had no knowledge of the customer outside BSS metrics or click-through numbers. The second audience had a greater urgency to understand what customers wanted. They understood that the future of their business depended on it.

I’ve deduced from that experience that the urgency of this topic is truly critical for C-levels because their future business models depend almost entirely on uptake of consumers; However, the message must be delivered throughout the organization, so that it resonates with the engineers.

But what do customers want? What are a bunch of lazy millennials willing to pay for and what will keep existing customers from jumping ship to new OTT providers? Will Amazon take over the world or is there a place for innovation among infrastructure-heavy incumbent providers?

The answer lies in an operator’s approach to innovation, because at the end of the day, innovation is what will catch the attention of a customer glued to their smartphone screen. It will make them look up. It will make them engage, and it will more importantly make them subscribe. I will also argue that that innovation must be linked directly to customer control.

The Business of Innovation
If IoT is a tricky word, then the word “innovation” is even trickier. For the purposes of this argument, IoT is the digitization of traditionally non-digitized industries. How do industries and business models embrace the world of the Internet and what opportunities will such an embrace entail?

To really understand the business behind monetizing IoT, service providers must look at before and after scenarios around some industries that have drastically been impacted by IoT.

Energy and Utilities
One can argue that the energy industry has undergone one of the most transformational evolutions of any industry as a result of IoT. According to a recent report, the global Smart Grid technology market is poised to grow at a CAGR of around 29.5% over the next decade to reach approximately $830.56 billion by 2025.

The introduction of Smart Grid, with an emphasis on advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) has allowed for utilities to better collect, understand and analyze customer usage information with the ultimate goal of forecasting and managing load reduction. More importantly, the technology has allowed customers to better understand, manage and control their energy use.

The deployments of new wireless mesh networks coupled with a wave of innovation around personal energy management, have offered up opportunities to those companies with the motivation and the tech know-how to help utilities transform their businesses. Whether it is management of those newly enhanced network operations centers or the systems necessary to help utilities understand the data now available, communications service providers have more than ample opportunity to support and collaborate with utilities on the future of energy distribution and management.

And, if AMI is not sexy enough, the race has already begun for building smart cities and enabling smart homes. The prize goes to those fastest and most innovative to market, with the customer at the center of their story.

Financial Services
By the time my children turn into responsible, account holding adults, retail banks may be obsolete. So is the direction we are moving in with the financial services industry. Despite the largest looming cyber threats ever, people are flocking to their computers to utilize online banking and money management tools. Direct deposit has become so popular it has threatened to make the U.S. Postal Service nearly obsolete.

But what is really driving the mad rush to online banking? I would argue that it is the same thing that is driving customer demand across all industries – control.

The Internet has introduced consumers to unprecedented control over their money, and everyone from applications developers to managed service providers have caught on. Telcos must sit up and smell the data centers.

Banking is a highly deregulated market, so helping the banking industry understand and help guide consumers through the digital channels to optimize investments and secure their futures is a challenge made possible only through the introduction of IoT. Therein lies great future opportunities for service providers.

Retail
There is arguably no industry greater impacted by IoT than retail. One needs to only take a visit to the abandoned storefronts in the local mall to see the physical implications of such a transition. And customers, my friend, are the grand prize for those businesses who can differentiate themselves in a highly competitive, overly crowded virtual world.

The market opportunity here is for those communications providers who can leverage their history of customer experience and stacks of data analytics tools to help online retailers hook customers – and not just for the moment — but for the long-term through cookies and other session data. The most innovative and qualified party able to help to reel in customers wins.

The opportunities in the retail environment for service providers is not a secret. Everything from online storefronts to billing, rating and charging to entire U/X designs are currently some services the telcos are offering their retail business customers.

In the olden days (when I was a young person), telcos would have one lonely opportunity, to offer telephone services. Even triple play seems like an ancient and underwhelming opportunity in comparison.

Real Estate
I can hardly remember the days before Realtor.com. In fact, I have bought at least three houses as a result of my own ability to surf and sort, itemize and customize. Long gone are the days of waiting for your real estate agent to drive by with the print outs and take you on never-ending site visits.

Managing information, data analytics and customization are all ways today’s operators are helping the real estate industry identify customers and manage their experiences.

IoT has reinvented the real estate customer experience. Putting control in the hands of the customer, as we saw similarly in the previous examples, once again, is critical to this industry’s evolution.

Industry Pressures from IoT Mean New Opportunities to Innovate for Operators But not all industries have seen a surge of business opportunity thanks to the proliferation of the Internet. Here are a few examples where IoT has disrupted industry is a strongly negative way. The question then arises from these examples is what is the role of the telecom service provider in these disrupted industries?

Music
The music industry is a clear example of a once thriving industry crippled strongly by the increased popularity of digital streaming. For an industry that moves from physical to digital mediums, purchase price has dropped astronomically. In addition, in today’s environment, where you can simply stream or download your favorite songs instead of being forced to buy an entire CD, the overall cost for music is going down.

As alluded to in the introduction to this section, the music industry is just one hit hard by the rise in IoT. Yet, telecom service providers can drink a glass half full if they are agile, innovative enough and hire a new group of hungry young millennials.

The upside of this industry challenge is the increased popularity of subscription services outside traditional voice, text, video and data. Can music be a service? Should telcos be looking at these models themselves, given their infrastructure capabilities to host and deliver content? It certainly makes for an industry discussion, particularly to those slightly weathered incumbents looking at competing against the hip younger players.

Education
Thankfully I haven’t yet heard of medical degrees being offered online, but chances are that is a matter of time. These days, to gain any level of education, one need only sit in front of the computer. While maybe not making us more social creatures, IoT is forcing a new generation of people to get educated online because it is easy.

But one of the greater challenges with the proliferation of online high education courses, means that the costs normally allocated to traditional brick and mortar universities are declining. There is no need to room and board. College textbooks are all online. According to a recent article, nearly 2.5 million fewer students are enrolling in colleges and universities.

This means that the education industry may be in desperate need for technology support from those who can best help them transform their businesses and make new investments in cloud infrastructure and related services. Whether it is the upward trend in purchasing solutions to meet the rising demand for online education or finding the right managed services strategies to partner with schools across the globe, telecom service providers should be paying close attention. Those with the desire to innovate and explore new territory will have much to gain from this industry’s need to adapt better to an IoT world.

The Roadmap to IoT Customer Innovation


There is one common thread in all of the industries highlighted above. It is opportunity. So, for telecom service providers in need of better understanding how to monetize IoT investments, I encourage them to look at IoT in a different way—as a door to the development of new innovative services. It is no secret that B2B revenue far exceeds residential, but with this gift of opportunity comes a great responsibility for operators.

Communications service providers must open their minds and step outside their comfort zone. They must engage with consumers better, remind themselves what it is like to be a consumer in industries outside telecom. They must also remember that what customers want now, more than ever, is control.

At the heart of this opportunity lies innovation and the demand for communications service providers to make a better effort to understand customer behavior outside traditional telecom services. They must re-examine their business service strategies to really appreciate the opportunities that IoT brings with it. If they don’t, their younger, more agile and music-listening competitors will.
Smart Grid Customer Education Symposium

2018 Smart Grid Customer Education Symposium to Take Place at CenterPoint Energy in Houston

Event to Focus on the Importance of Customer Education for the Advancement and Adoption of New Technologies

HOUSTON, TEXAS — March 12, 2018 — The eighth annual www.smartgridcustomereducation.com is set to take place on October 15, 2018 in Houston, Texas. The event will focus on engaging customers on the journey to grid modernization and cover such topics as advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) education, optimizing smart grid investments, and innovative ways of engaging and empowering consumers.

For nearly a decade, the Symposium has attracted the nation’s leaders in smart grid education. This year’s event, which is set to take place at CenterPoint Energy’s corporate headquarters, will highlight the importance of customer education and community and stakeholder collaboration for the advancement and adoption of new technologies.

During a time when customers play a critical role in technology investment and adoption, this year’s event also takes on the topic of the “utility of the future” and preparing for the next-generation utility-customer relationship.

“With the race to the utility of the future, this is an exciting time to be discussing innovative approaches to customer education and technology trends,” said Juliet Shavit, Founder of SmartEnergy IP. “The customer plays a critical role in the definition of requirements around the utility of the future. Engaging with customers to partner on technology innovation and adoption will lead us all to a better, brighter tomorrow.”

The Honorary DeAnn T. Walker, Chairman of the Texas Public Utility Commission, will keynote the event.

For more information about the event and to register, visit Smart Grid Customer Education Symposium.

About SmartEnergy IP
SmartEnergy IP is a strategic communications and research organization within SmartMark Communications dedicated to helping articulate the benefits of energy technology investment and innovation for consumers. As utilities implement smart energy initiatives – from smart meters to dynamic pricing programs – there are ways to ensure that customers are best prepared to make smart energy choices and positively support these roll outs.

Furthermore, as utilities develop their roadmap for the future, SmartEnergy IP helps utilities and stakeholders define the technology and business requirements necessary to develop and implement customer-focused programs that benefit communities and meet policy goals.

For more information, visit: www.smartenergy-ip.com.

Smart grid 2.0: the role of consumers in grid modernisation

Smart Grid Utility-Week

01/04/2018 By Juliet Shavit
SmartMark Communications

The last meter is in – now what?
Utilities learned an important lesson during the rollout of smart meters – that customers would not be passive participants in the technology decision. Further, that educating customers before, during and after the deployment about the benefits of technology advancement was beneficial to all parties. Of course, now that many utilities have achieved recovery for advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) deployment efforts, questions are raised once again about the continued need to engage customers in the dialogue around technology advancement and investment. One would think that the lessons learned in Bakersfield, California nearly a decade ago would have remained strongly engrained in the minds of utilities. But, new grid modernisation efforts are proving otherwise.

Utilities that have successfully deployed AMI are now faced with some important questions, namely:

  1. What do they now need to do to optimise these investments?
  2. What are the benefits to consumers to make these technology advancements
  3. How much will it cost to educate consumers and what is the risk/benefits analysis of doing do?

Let’s take a closer look at the current dilemmas facing utilities looking to further undergo transformation in the area of grid modernisation and the role of the consumer during the process.

How can utilities optimise AMI investments?
A key mistake utilities made when they built their AMI business cases was to assume that technology transformation would end with the last meter in, and when the networks were optimised. Of course, regulators needed a defined timeline and cost to approve AMI, but any technologist would understand inherently that technology transformation is a process—one not ordinarily a one-time deal. That is because, of course, digital infrastructure must be upgraded and maintained as technology advances.

Furthermore, those networking companies that promised transformation of the grid through AMI should have mentioned that the smart meter network is simply a platform from which transformation blossoms. It is the backbone for new applications to run over it. The end game was never just understanding customer energy use.

What are the customer benefits of grid modernisation?
The conversation around smart technology is an ironic one. Why does one assume that enabling equipment with a wifi capability or plugging into the Internet makes something smart? IoT has most certainly brought about the introduction of smart solutions, and enabling infrastructure to respond in real-time to a changing landscape does make something smart, but an important piece of the equation is how utilities deploy this kind of infrastructure or utilise advanced technologies to modernise the grid. This means that smart people must know what to do with smart technologies to solve real world problems.

In the case of the grid, reliability and security remain top priorities for modernising the grid. While those functions may not necessarily rely on customer engagement, customers most certainly can understand the benefits of those investments.

Yet, kWh reduction is an example of a component to grid modernisation that involves people making intelligent decisions to understand, manage and control their energy use. While automation helps, choosing to automate homes through use of smart home appliance or smart devices is a responsibility that falls on the consumer. So, while customers may not see the need to protest in the streets about self-healing networks, there are significant benefits to those utilities that keep the benefits discussion going with customers, as well as the responsibility to educate, empower and sometimes arm customers with the tools and technologies necessary to help them participate in a sustainable smart energy lifestyle.

What are the benefits to consumers for these technology advancements?
As mentioned above, lower energy bills are not always the primary benefit to consumers when it comes to grid reliability. This means that utilities should be careful about what they promise in their messages. However, understanding that their communities are safer and more resilient from any kind of threat—whether that is man or nature made—is a real benefit that should be articulated to consumers around grid modernisation. Furthermore, environmental benefits around carbon reduction most certainly can be seen as a benefit to consumers.

So, for those utilities and policy makers who are tasked with allocating funds for grid modernisation, or approving business cases related to these investments, it is wise to ensure that the customer is not left behind. Consumers can be the largest proponents of these advancements and play a critical role to both deployment of new technology and adoption of it.

How much will it cost to educate consumers?
Isn’t this always the trick question. Rather than put a dollar amount next to the grid modernisation line item, perhaps it is wiser to calculate a price per customer that equates to a percentage of the overall technology investment. If customers are indeed necessary to the success of grid modernisation, that technology education should be part and parcel to the funding of any grid mod business case.

What are the risks of not educating consumers?
One can already hear the naysayers in the room. They are the same utilities that felt it was completely appropriate to put smart meters on homes and businesses without letting anyone know. These are the same utilities that say, “there is no need to educate customers about operational investments of the utility.” Those are the same utilities that spent three times as much money on crises communications when their customers complained of higher bills and/or their meters caught fires.

One can argue that the risk of lack of education is twofold—one is the slow adoption of behavioral change, and the other are the costs associated with crises communications should customers decide they have been taken advantage of.

Advice for utilities and policymakers
The new year is upon us and one of the great advantages that the Internet and advanced technology has brought us is the ability to communicate better, louder and more directly than ever before. For those utilities and policy makers who are struggling with how to address the needs of customers during the grid modernisation process, it is best to remember the power of the customer has never been greater. Whether it is the ease and wide availability of social media or the ability to reach regulators more directly and profoundly than ever before—the voice of the customer is loud and wants to be heard. Best to harness it for its ability to improve our energy future, not wait for what happens when it is ignored.

Four Corners of the Utility of the Future

Electric Light & Power

12/12/2017 By Juliet Shavit
SmartMark Communications

These days, there is a lot of talk in our industry about abstract ideas—whether that is the smart home, smart city, digital customer, and of course utility of the future. Nearly every utility I meet with seems to be on this path for the Holy Grail, but not one seems to know how to define it exactly. But, the task is not impossible for those of us that have come out of AMI and smart grid deployments and are actively engaged with people outside our industry. Below is a look at what key requirements are necessary to become the utility of the future, based on lessons learned from technology innovation and industry leadership.

Lesson #1—Customer First
One of the greatest lessons learned from smart grid deployments is that customers matter. Not just that they can disrupt large-scale investments, but that they legitimately matter in the adoption of tools to help meet the needs of the business case. For example, we have seen utilities with strong operational business cases simply not get recovery. Whether that is because they overextended themselves in terms of rose garden promises or that they misjudged the power of strong stakeholders that argued against cost recovery, it is the case. And these same utilities did not do an adequate job of educating their key constituents including stakeholders, policy makers and consumers on the benefits of smart grid investment.

Educational programs were ignored because the funding was not deemed meaningful to the business case. Unfortunately, these same regulatory attorneys who made that case unfortunately did not weigh customer benefits into the cost recovery process. It was a missed opportunity. We learned from those utilities that did, that the investment was well worth it. Further, for those utilities that are now contemplating optimizing those investments through more sophisticated demand response and time of use programs, the early education will pay off triple fold. Those utilities that did not educate are left at ground zero of the process and many with an already heavy burden of AMI line items on the bill. Now they must educate customers why they must increase peak rates in addition to paying a fee for other operational benefits for the utility.

For those utilities that began customer education early and invested in a more meaningful two-way relationship with the customer, you are already winning the race to Utility of the Future.

Lesson #2—Smart Technology Adoption
Meters are in. Customers have been told that utilities are future proofing their infrastructure. Now what is the story line for technology adoption. For those utilities who have communicated a long-term commitment to technology adoption and already have begun introducing benefits, the path to next phase customer control is clearer. New in-home energy management technologies and tools are more prevalent than ever before, and the utility has an opportunity to take advantage of this.

How does the utility take advantage of the marketplace for in-home smart energy technology and ride on the current innovation tidal wave? Those utilities that can develop strategic partnerships with some of the technology vendors and build awareness around what products and applications map best to their segmented audiences, will rise ahead of the pack. The bonus is that they will help automate energy use for customers and make long-term smarter energy lifestyles attainable.

Lesson #3—Commitment to Education
We have discussed how early education has become the advantage for those utilities coming out of AMI deployments and thinking about dynamic pricing or TOU rates. We have also noted that education around the tools and technologies available to consumers is a pathway to sustainable energy reduction. That makes a strong commitment to customer education a key requirement for the utility of the future.

There is only one thing about the future that is certain, we don’t know what it will look like. That means that taking all your stakeholders with you on the journey will help make the life of utilities easier. That’s not just customers. That’s education for policy makers and special interest groups – even naysayers.

Lesson #4—Fearlessness to Innovate and Be First
Finally, it is fearlessness that will crown the Utility of the Future. One thing is true about the utility industry—nobody wants to be first, especially when it comes to technology. We have a safety system around pilots. It takes a whole lot of approvals to even try something.

But what if one utility just makes the leap because they think it is best for their customers. I can think of one cooperative that did just that. The Chief Business Officer decided to redesign the bill entirely. He gave a blank slate to the designers and met with customers to talk through what works best for them. The result is industry leadership and the nicest looking bill in the industry. That utility’s customer satisfaction levels remain very high.

In speaking with many regulators over the past year, I find it terribly hard to believe that regulators want to stand in the way of innovation. It is their job to decide who will pay for it, and that is fair. The utility must understand the needs of its customers and present a business case worth approving. But, innovation is not the problem and the opportunity to innovate in today’s world is astounding.

It should not be left up to applications and product developers alone to invest in innovation. Their goals are different than utilities. They want to push products. Utilities need to be innovative and respond in real time to the needs of customers. That makes them leaders in customer service, leaders in technology adoption, and leaders in the industry.

This means that the customer plays a critical role in the definition of requirements around utility of the future. Engaging with customers to partner on technology innovation and adoption will lead all to a better, brighter future.

About the author: Juliet Shavit is head of the SmartMark Group, a family of companies that including SmartMark Communications, SmartEnergy IP, SmartShows, and SmartHoldings. Her companies work with a number of highly visible public and private companies as well as leading global industry organizations and governments. Shavit is also the founder of The Homeland Security for Networked Industries (HSNI) Conference, GridComms, and The Smart Grid Customer Education Symposium series.

Juliet Shavit to Keynote IIEA’s “Take Charge” Energy Conference in Dublin this Month

SmartMark CEO to Focus on the Role of the Customer in the Future of Energy

DUBLIN, IRELAND (November 1, 2017) — SmartMark Communications, a global leader in strategic communications and business innovation, announced today that its CEO, Juliet Shavit, will be keynoting the “Take Charge” energy conference in Dublin this month. The event is hosted by the Institute of International and European Affairs and ESB, Ireland’s largest energy provider.

Shavit will be speaking at 9:00 am on November 23, 2017 in The Round Room adjacent to the Mansion House in Dublin.

Shavit is a pioneer in the area of utility customer engagement and the founder of SmartEnergy IP™, a division within SmartMark Communications dedicated solely to smart grid customer education. Shavit has been instrumental in helping utilities, stakeholders and policy makers across the world understand the critical role customers play in technology investments and deployments.

“It is a great honor to be asked to speak by the IIEA on a subject that is close to my heart,” said Shavit. “It is more important than ever for utilities to understand the critical role customers play to technology investment. Technology for the sake of technology will never be enough — it is only by customers engaging with technology and fully understanding its benefits that we will see the fruits of these investments and a more sustainable and brighter energy future.”

To learn more about how SmartMark Communications is transforming the utility-customer relationship, visit www.smartmarkglobal.com.

About SmartMark Communications
For nearly two decades, SmartMark Communications has been a world leader in strategic communications, helping businesses emerge as leaders in the industries they perform. Today, SmartMark has expanded its services to include consumer strategy solutions for businesses looking to improve their overall customer experience. With end-to-end communications solutions under one roof including: public relations, marketing consulting, design and creative, interactive and web services, and market research, SmartMark remains the ideal partner for companies looking to take charge of their industries and lead the way through innovation.

About SmartEnergy IP™
SmartEnergy IP is a strategic communications and research organization within SmartMark Communications dedicated to helping articulate the benefits of energy technology investment and innovation for consumers. As utilities implement smart energy initiatives – from smart meters to dynamic pricing programs – there are ways to ensure that customers are best prepared to make smart energy choices and positively support these roll outs.

Furthermore, as utilities develop their roadmap for the future, SmartEnergy IP helps utilities and stakeholders define the technology and business requirements necessary to develop and implement customer-focused programs that benefit communities and meet policy goals.

For more information, visit: www.smartenergy-ip.com.

Contact:
Kristin Marcell

SmartMark Communications, LLC
+1-215-504-4272
kristin@smartmarkusa.com

SmartMark CEO Juliet Shavit to Talk ‘IoT and the Customer’ at TM Forum’s Innovation InFocus Event

October 25, 2017 – PHILADELPHIA, PA – SmartMark Communications, a global leader in strategic communications and business innovation, announced today that its President and CEO, Juliet Shavit, will speak at the TM Forum’s 2017 “Innovation InFocus” event taking place in Dallas, Texas on November 7-8, 2017. Juliet will speak on the topic of “IoT and the Customer” at 3:30pm on November 8th.

Shavit is a world-renowned expert on the impact of technology innovation on customer experience. Her session will hit home to many of the attendees as they seek to build the business case for investments in IoT applications.

“Understanding how to break down the business case for IoT investment is critical for today’s operators as they seek to justify departures from core services and compete more fiercely for the customer in today’s market,” said Juliet Shavit. “With the digitization of industry and the sophistication of these new networks and coinciding analytics, operators should be at the forefront of helping these businesses understand how to optimize the customer experience and improve overall satisfaction.”

Shavit will talk through her experiences in working with industries like telecom, energy, music, and healthcare and demonstrate how business innovation built with a strong customer focus and the necessary analytics will help operators monetize IoT.

To learn more about how SmartMark Communications is leading the industry in IoT customer strategies, visit smartmarkglobal.com.

About SmartMark Communications
For nearly two decades, SmartMark Communications has been a world leader in strategic communications, helping businesses emerge as leaders in the industries they perform. Today, SmartMark has expanded its services to include consumer strategy solutions for businesses looking to improve their overall customer experience. With end-to-end communications solutions under one roof including: public relations, public affairs, marketing consulting, design and creative, interactive and web services, and market research, SmartMark remains the ideal partner for companies looking to take charge of their industries and lead the way through innovation.

Contact:
Kristin Marcell
SmartMark Communications, LLC
+1 (215) 504-4272
kristin@smartmarkusa.com

SmartMark CEO, Juliet Shavit, Talks the Business of Innovation at TIA Connectivity Jam 2017

Shavit leads panel discussion on the business case for innovation investment

DALLAS, TX – June 5, 2017SmartMark Communications, LLC, a world leader in communications and innovation strategy, announced today that its CEO, Juliet Shavit, would be leading a panel at the Telecom Industry Association (TIA) Connectivity Jam 2017 event in Dallas, Texas. The panel, titled, “The New Carrier” will take place on June 6, 2017 at 1:30pm.

The panel will focus on how today’s current digital marketplace is forcing communications service providers to rethink their business models and the importance of investing in innovation. Shavit has been widely recognized for her approach to innovation as it pertains to customer experience and engagement.

“Innovation is only as important as the business case behind it. You can have the most advanced technologies and innovative applications, but unless you can build a sound business case for investment that includes ROI and improved customer experience, then all you have is just another shiny new toy,” said Shavit.

SmartMark Communications works with businesses globally on helping them understand customer experience investment and the value of innovation. By providing council on industry best practices, market competition, and the latest cutting edge available technologies, SmartMark works with companies to build and manage robust and rewarding metrics-driven customer experience programs.

To schedule a meeting with Juliet Shavit at the show, contact Lyndsay Pocorobba at lyndsay@smartmarkusa.com .

About SmartMark Communications
For nearly two decades, SmartMark Communications has been a world leader in strategic communications, helping businesses emerge as leaders in the industries they perform. Today, SmartMark has expanded its services to include consumer strategy solutions for businesses looking to improve their overall customer experience.

With end-to-end communications solutions under one roof including: public relations, marketing consulting, design and creative, interactive and web services, and market research, SmartMark remains the ideal partner for companies looking to take charge of their industries and lead the way through innovation.

Contact:
Lyndsay Pocorobba
SmartMark Communications
+1 (215) 504-4272
lyndsay@smartmarkusa.com

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How we will consume music in the future – according to the experts

It is easy to forget how incredibly disruptive in the past ten years has been the way music is distributed and consumed. We have received great streaming services with gigantic range. But what’s the next step? We asked some experts.

It is easy to forget how incredibly disruptive in the past ten years has been the way music is distributed and consumed. We have received great streaming services with gigantic range. But what’s the next step? We asked some experts.

Spotify, Deezer and SoundCloud are some of the services included in the mobile operator 3’s offer of free surfing for music streaming . These are services that we now take for granted and that is a big part of the change that occurred in the music industry in recent years. Are they still on in, say, ten years? Let’s hear what the experts say. Alex Esser – music contractor Alex Esser is an IT entrepreneur, with among other things the smart music service Tuna spot under his belt. As a music geek and he runs DJ House Music With Love , a concept that holds podcasts, a blog and record label. Since the beginning of 2014, he was Nordic Head of the French streaming service Deezer, with six million paying users worldwide. He sees a clear movement away from the traditional album format. We will increasingly consume music flows, he says. At the beginning of the streaming wave, services created all their own playlists, which were also relatively fixed. Now we as users are accustomed to be served, and we want to have a flow instead. The music should be accessible and easy to consume, and the flow is changing all the time. He believes, for example, the phone’s built-in accelerometer will be able to perceive how we travel and thus adapt the music flow after a car ride, walking or jogging. Voice control is also an important next step in development. We will be able to control most with voice, and then you can just say to your streaming service, “play my favorite songs,” “give me something new,” “I’m sorry” or “now is the pre-party!”, You get a completely customized and personalized music stream for you and your situation. Music is, in other words, a soundtrack, a backdrop to life. When everything is available, music can also be an additional service to strengthen the various types of other offerings. In Sweden, we already see how the streaming services are closely linked with mobile operators’ offerings, as we do with Deezer 3, for example. But banks, utility companies, broadband companies – or why not the landlords? Might as well add music to attract new customers. It costs relatively little to entice a young person who may become a customer for life. Juliet Shavit – communicator Juliet Shavit, CEO of the communications agency SmartMark Communications and executive director of MusiComms, an association that brings together leaders from companies in the music and technology industries to find new revenue models and innovative ways to use music for brand building purposes. She believes, like Alex Esser, we will see many new and unexpected platforms for music distribution in the future. Absolutely. Everyone talks about the Internet of Things and how different industries are linked together. Music plays a very important role in how to create customer engagement. The market for IoT is estimated to be worth three trillion U.S. dollars in the current situation, and Juliet Shavit believes that this emerging industry, in fact, may be the music industry’s rescue. The biggest problem right now is that there is a training curve – the music industry must itself be able to understand and utilize the technology to grow. The traditional streaming model puts the music industry at a disadvantage. By optimizing and finding income in IoT the power will go back into the hands of the music industry. According to a U.S. survey of 4,000 consumers, 40 percent would be willing to change mobile operator depending on the music plan that is available in the subscription. Juliet Shavit is convinced that the music industry is facing a new renaissance when the music industry understands how to navigate the IoT world and regain faith in music’s value. With new revenue and new distribution methods in the music industry, there will also be better compensated songwriters – and the rest of the value chain will be able to flourish. New business opportunities mean new compensation opportunities, which in turn leads to creativity flowing more freely. Sara Herrlin and Björn Lindborg – korsbefruktarna Stockholm has over the past decade found, many say, the least successful marriage between music, technology and entrepreneurship. But subordinate gatherings would cause even more cross-fertilization to take shape. That realization led to the record label veterans Sara Herrlin and Björn Lindborg founding GBG Music City, a new venue for music and technology. Inspired and close ties STHLM Tech and SUP46 started this new venue for music and technology to take shape in early in 2016. The vision is still physical hub meetings to supplement the digital switch, says Sara Herrlin. We are building a strong community where I think a lot transformation can be done through the combination of experience from the traditional industry with amazing young and innovative startups. What’s beyond streaming services? I think streaming services will remain a little while and develop even more from their strong platforms. However, I think everything will be more open and freely available in the near future. It is very interesting to follow startups like Soundtrap where artists create and distribute with each other directly through a platform – a step beyond SoundCloud who was also early in the spray. Will the whole way of thinking with a “45-minute rock album every two years” disappear in favor of a more playful and open approach to artistry? That is what we hope, says Björn Lindborg. Playlists have already replaced the album as a concept and we believe in the future is dynamic “artist bundles”. By this we mean that the future album will constantly be updated with new versions, new songs, new remixes. Basically, we always have composition and the text, but the number of recorded versions will only be more. We also believe that many more people than before will create music and make it available to the public – tools like Soundtrap will certainly grow up with platforms like Spotify. Many of today’s hits are created in the boy- or girlfriends’ rooms of completely unknown musicians. Then get the momentum and interest online. The time when record companies were gatekeepers is thankfully over. What is the next step in the music experience? Here we have confidence in virtual reality and augmented reality, says Bjorn. Streaming has revolutionized the distribution and availability, but the music experience leaves much to be desired. But VR and AR can once again put the artist in focus, and it becomes easier for the artist to express themselves creatively through both audio and video. Anders Haby – VR enthusiast Just like Bjorn Linderborg suggests a quickly growing market for virtual reality and augmented reality. In short, it is conceivable that we go on virtual 360 concerts together with our friends. Samsung has actually already live broadcast RMH Block Party 02 – optimized to be consumed with VR glasses. Anders Haby drives the fledgling site VRGeeks.se. He sees a huge potential for development in this area, but is skeptical that the live music experience will knock on a broad front. To stream live concerts in VR is probably not as great as you might think, he says. It will be many years before it really comes through and the reason is that the experience will be far behind the real. The amount of data required to provide a reasonably sharp image of 360 degrees is huge. Unfortunately, I also believe that we are too busy today to watch something together that is not live. By contrast, to download and see for yourself at a concert that you had not been able to witness is definitely something that will be great. Closest at hand, says Anders Haby, are experiences related to electronic music. It definitely has the opportunity to succeed, a digitally rendered concert that does not compete with a real experience. These experiences are better suited to musical genres where the music has much more focus than the artist – for example, electronic music – but also traditional artists can do cool experiences. A good example is Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody in 360 degrees. The technology is basically ready now for an all-digital concert. It is of course assuming that more should have VR goggles in the home. Most likely it becomes more common in two to three years. How would VR be able to influence the way we consume music? Imagine that you are walking on a street and all you see pulsates to the music. Maybe it pops up digital dancers from all sides? You know it’s not real, but the music is raised to the next level. With this technology, the record companies to deliver a music experience that is only limited by the imagination.
IoT Internet of Things

SmartMark Leads Industry in Conversation Around IoT Customer Experience

SmartMark Encourages Companies to See Past the “Glitter of New Gadgets” and Understand the Longer-Term Business Applications and Relevancy of New Technology Adoption

LAS VEGAS – January 5, 2017 – SmartMark Communications, the leader in customer experience strategy, announced today the release of a new Framework for evaluating long-term relevancy and adoption of new technologies. The Framework, titled “Technology Adoption and Customer Centricity” (TACC), is being released in conjunction with CES® 2017, the premier consumer electronics and technology innovation event.

The TACC Framework focuses on helping businesses optimize consumer-facing technology spending by understanding customer preferences and preferred offerings, and prioritizing investment.

“It is easy to get swept up in the excitement around the next big technology,” said Juliet Shavit, President and CEO of SmartMark Communications. “But it is important for businesses to keep their focus on the customer’s longer-term experience and satisfaction. It is customer satisfaction that will drive meaningful ROI.”

The new Framework is a measurement tool that uses a series of calculations to determine likelihood for success, drawing into consideration such factors as external stakeholder support and marketability.

To receive a copy of the Framework report, contact SmartMark at 215-504-4272 or email Lyndsay Pocorobba at lyndsay@smartmarkusa.com.

About SmartMark Communications, LLC
SmartMark Communications is a global leader in communications strategy, helping businesses strategically position themselves as thought leaders and utilize media and influencer relations to help shape their industries. The company is recognized for its ability to innovate and use technology applications to improve customer experience and drive behavior change. To learn more, visit www.smartmarkglobal.com.

Contact
SmartMark Communications, LLC
Lyndsay Pocorobba, +1-215-504-4272
lyn@smartmarkusa.com
 

SmartMark Communications Leads Industry in Conversation Around IoT Customer Experience; Identifies Framework for Application of New Technologies

SmartMark Encourages Companies to See Past the “Glitter of New Gadgets” and Understand the Longer-Term Business Applications and Relevancy of New Technology Adoption

LAS VEGAS – January 5, 2017 – SmartMark Communications, the leader in customer experience strategy, announced today the release of a new Framework for evaluating long-term relevancy and adoption of new technologies. The Framework, titled “Technology Adoption and Customer Centricity” (TACC), is being released in conjunction with CES® 2017, the premier consumer electronics and technology innovation event.

The TACC Framework focuses on helping businesses optimize consumer-facing technology spending by understanding customer preferences and preferred offerings, and prioritizing investment.

“It is easy to get swept up in the excitement around the next big technology,” said Juliet Shavit, President and CEO of SmartMark Communications. “But it is important for businesses to keep their focus on the customer’s longer-term experience and satisfaction. It is customer satisfaction that will drive meaningful ROI.”

The new Framework is a measurement tool that uses a series of calculations to determine likelihood for success, drawing into consideration such factors as external stakeholder support and marketability.

To receive a copy of the Framework report, contact SmartMark at 215-504-4272 or email Lindsay Ambrose Cavanaugh at lcavanaugh@smartmarkusa.com.

About SmartMark Communications, LLC
SmartMark Communications is a global leader in communications strategy, helping businesses strategically position themselves as thought leaders and utilize media and influencer relations to help shape their industries. The company is recognized for its ability to innovate and use technology applications to improve customer experience and drive behavior change. To learn more, visit www.smartmarkglobal.com.

Contact
SmartMark Communications, LLC
Lyndsay Pocorobba, +1-215-504-4272
lyndsay@smartmarkusa.com